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Future Imperfect: This Is 2022 at a Glance

New year, new trends.

On the heels of yet another harrowing year comes a handful of trends across fields like fashion, travel, and wellness that wouldn’t have existed if it weren’t for the ongoing pandemic. Sure, we (still) have more questions than answers, but as the world soldiers on, we offer a peek into what 2022 will look like – and it’s not all bad.

Beauty

Beauty

We called it last year – waterless beauty is only set to skyrocket in popularity as we seek to make more eco-friendly choices. And like 2021, beauty will be more fun and joyful in the months ahead, resulting in the dominance of celestial nail art and makeup palettes housing bright hues. Y2K nostalgia is another major trend, so expect to see unapologetically shiny lips (courtesy of ‘plastic’ lip gloss) and 90s-inspired hairstyles (think: ultra-sleek strands and playful accessories). Elsewhere, the world of clean beauty will bring with it more transparency – about time, too. Considering the term doesn’t entail with one clear definition, beauty giants like Ulta and Sephora have not only started establishing guidelines with regards to formulation, but also helping consumers identify which products adhere to them. 

Fashion 

Fashion

But why should beauty have all the fun? Fashion will also be fun and frivolous in 2022, indicating a universal yearning for simpler (read: pre-pandemic) times. After way too long of WFH and living in athleisure around the clock, the months ahead will be rooted in feeling optimistic and dressing to the nines. Translation: higher hemlines, bright bags, 70s-esque sparkle. The 90s will influence fashion, too, so chain belts will be big. Not the navel-baring type? Wear yours over a knit dress. And because the fashion world loves playing with extremes, expect your shirts to go oversized and your blazers to shrink. As for the trend we’re most excited about? The return of party shoes, of course!

Food

Food

2022 will bring with it some rather unexpected additions to the menu – potato milk, anyone? The next big thing in non-dairy milks, it’s low in both sugar and saturated fat, and kinder to the environment from a production perspective. Chefs and home cooks alike will not only increasingly use locally sourced food, but also commit to reducing waste by using all parts of the vegetable (stalks and stems included). Another trend that will only gain traction? Non-alcoholic concoctions that are more thoughtfully designed and artfully presented than the sugary mocktails of the past. Owing to their health-boosting properties, the category of fermented beverages is also set to grow. And because we’ll continue to eat in a lot more, we’ll expect more of our dining out experiences – personalised menus, more intimate settings, or inclusive of cooking classes.

Travel

Travel

While it’s impossible to pinpoint which industry was most negatively impacted by the pandemic, one thing is for certain: travel is up there on the list. According to the experts at Expedia, this is the year we’ll take our GOAT trip – a.k.a. the Greatest of All Trips. It comes as no surprise that after two years of not travelling, we’re ready for excitement and willing to splurge. And because planning during a pandemic is an oxymoron, travellers will be a lot more spontaneous, especially as airlines and hotels continue to offer more flexibility in case of cancellations. Like 2021, wellness retreats and nature-centric destinations will continue to soar in popularity, drawing focus away from big city breaks. Opting for staycations and domestic travel over far-flung locales is another travel trend carrying over into 2022 from last year.

Wellness

Wellness

2022 will bring with it a continued focus on self-care, resulting in wellness trends that should’ve been a part of our lives much earlier (yes, better late than never). Workouts that benefit both mind and body will gain popularity, as will practices like breathwork. Another seemingly simple activity, walking, will help us cope with yet another year of uncertainty – who can forget the Hot Girl Walk that took over social media in 2021? And because we’re increasingly invested in the health of the planet, menstruation products will be a lot more eco-friendly, with the likes of The Period Company, Looni, and Lunette paving the way. Lastly, both reducetarian and flexitarian diets will encourage us to eat fewer animal products, with The Gaggler soon making a case for such a lifestyle over eliminating them entirely.

Watch this space.

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Around the World with Eid Al-Fitr

Celebrate the fast, differently

Eid al Fitr and Eid ul Fitr are different spellings of the same Arabic phrase which means “festival of breaking the fast”. “Eid” is the Arabic word for “festival” or “holiday”, and it is used to refer to both Eid ul Fitr and Eid al Adha, another important Islamic holiday that commemorates the willingness of Prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son, as an act of submission to (PBUH) Allah’s command.

This is a time when Muslims come together to offer prayers, exchange gifts, and share meals with their loved ones. It is also a time to reflect on the values of Islam, such as compassion, generosity, and forgiveness, and to strengthen ties with family, friends, and the community.

Eid’s Global Significance

Eid is one of the most significant and widely celebrated festivals in the world. It is an occasion that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting, and is a time of joy, celebration, and giving thanks. The significance of Eid is not just limited to Muslims; it is also recognised and celebrated by people from different cultures and religions around the world.

The significance of Eid varies across cultures and countries. In some countries, such as Egypt, Eid is celebrated for three days, while in others, such as Turkey, it is celebrated for four days. In some countries, such as Indonesia, Eid is known as “Lebaran” and is celebrated with traditional foods, such as Ketupat and Rendang. In other countries, such as Pakistan, Eid is a time for new clothes, henna designs, and special desserts, such as sheer khurma.

One of the most important aspects of Eid is the act of giving. Muslims are encouraged to donate to charity and to give gifts to friends and family members, especially to children. This act of giving is a way of expressing gratitude for the blessings that one has received throughout the year and is an opportunity to share those blessings with others.

Another important aspect of Eid is the gathering of family and friends. Muslims are encouraged to visit their relatives and loved ones during Eid and to strengthen ties with them. In some countries, such as Saudi Arabia, it is customary to visit the graves of loved ones during Eid and to pray for their souls.

Eid is also a time to forgive and seek forgiveness. Muslims are encouraged to forgive those who have wronged them and to seek forgiveness from those whom they have wronged. This act of forgiveness is a way of purifying one’s soul and starting anew.

UAE Eid Al-Fitr Celebrations

Eid al-Fitr is one of the most significant celebrations in the UAE, marking the end of Ramadan and a month-long fast from sunrise to sunset for Muslims. The festival is celebrated with much joy and enthusiasm, with families and friends coming together to share food, exchange gifts, and greetings, and participate in a range of traditions.

The day typically starts with a special Eid prayer, which is held at mosques and prayer grounds across the country. After the prayer, families often visit each other’s homes or gather in public spaces to enjoy traditional foods such as dates, sweets, and other delicacies. Children are often given money or gifts by their elders, and many families dress up in their finest clothes for the occasion.

In the UAE, there are also many events and activities that take place throughout the Eid al-Fitr period. These include traditional markets, food festivals, and cultural performances, as well as fireworks displays and other outdoor activities. Many shopping malls and other venues also hold special events and promotions during this time.

Overall, Eid al-Fitr is a time of joy and celebration in the UAE, with people of all ages and backgrounds coming together to share in the festivities and express their gratitude for the blessings of the past month.

Eid Celebrations Around the World

Eid al-Fitr is celebrated in various ways around the world, often reflecting the local cultural traditions and customs. Here are some examples:

Indonesia: In Indonesia, Eid al-Fitr is known as Lebaran. The celebrations typically last for one week, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and seek forgiveness from one another. Special food is prepared, including ketupat (a type of rice cake), rendang (spicy meat dish), and opor ayam (chicken in coconut milk).

Egypt: In Egypt, Eid al-Fitr is known as Eid el-Fitr. The celebrations last for three days, during which people wear new clothes and visit family and friends. Special dishes are prepared, including fata (a bread and rice dish), kahk (a type of biscuit), and maamoul (a sweet pastry).

Turkey: In Turkey, Eid al-Fitr is known as Şeker Bayramı (Sugar Festival). The celebrations last for three days, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and give candy or small gifts to children. Special dishes are prepared, including baklava (a sweet pastry) and güllaç (a dessert made from thin layers of pastry soaked in milk).

Malaysia: In Malaysia, Eid al-Fitr is known as Hari Raya Aidilfitri (Celebration Day). The celebrations last for one month, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and seek forgiveness from one another. Special dishes are prepared, including lemang (glutinous rice cooked in bamboo), rendang (spicy meat dish), and ketupat (a type of rice cake).

United States: In the United States, Eid al-Fitr is celebrated by Muslim communities across the country. Many communities hold special prayer services, followed by communal meals and other festivities. In some cities, there are even public celebrations, such as parades and street fairs.

Iceland: In Iceland, Eid al-Fitr celebrations are unique, in part, because the Ramadan fast is performed in a way that is not to be seen anywhere else in the world. Iceland’s midnight sun phenomenon means that during Ramadan many Muslims fast for up to 22 hours a day! Muslims in Iceland do have the choice to break their fast based on the timings of sunrise and sunset from the nearest country, or of Saudi Arabia, however many have iftar when the sun breaks above the Icelandic horizon. So when Eid al-Fitr comes around, the celebrations are magical. The capital city of Reykjavik has a few mosques where the joyous merrymaking takes place and guests come laden with food inspired by Indonesian, Egyptian, and Eritrean cuisines to celebrate this holy day.

Morocco: In Morocco, Eid al-Fitr festivities give center stage to the country’s colourful culinary dishes. Where other countries focus on gift-giving and more commercialised displays of celebrations, Moroccans, after their morning prayers, hold low-key foodie affairs with family and friends. Lamb, couscous, and prunes feature prominently in meals throughout the day, followed by traditional cookies and pastries.

These are just a few examples of how Eid al-Fitr is celebrated around the world. Regardless of the specific customs and traditions, the holiday is a time for joy, forgiveness, and a renewed commitment to one’s faith and community.

Eid is a significant festival that is celebrated around the world by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. It is a time of joy, celebration, and gratitude and is an opportunity to reflect on the values of Islam, such as compassion, generosity, and forgiveness. It is a time to strengthen ties with family, friends, and the community and to express thanks for the blessings that one has received throughout the year.

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