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You, But Better: The Gaggler Agenda for March

Mark your calendars.

March 1: Immerse in Art

Art Dubai returns to Madinat Jumeirah, bringing with it the event’s largest edition to date. Taking place from 1-5 March, the 16th instalment will feature more than presentations from over 40 countries across four sections – Contemporary, Modern, Bawwaba, and Digital – as well as performances, commissions, talks and educational programmes.

Learn more here.

March 3: Head to Hai

With Ramadan expected to begin on March 22, Hai Ramadan at Expo City Dubai is kickstarting the festivities, all of which are family-friendly. Guests can expect over 50 days of regional cuisine, children’s activities, a communal iftar table, a charity activation and more. Don’t miss the engaging performance featuring Rashid and Latifa on a quest to find the moon while you’re there.

Learn more here.

March 5: Trust Yourself

If art with a side of emotional expression – and without any self-judgement – is in order, book in for the Blindfolded Painting Workshop led by ceramic and glass designer Ankisha Jhawar. Conducted in English, the 90-minute session will be held at art and events space The Workshop in Jumeirah.

Learn more here.

March 7: Learn and Grow

If learning from the wisdom of over 2,000 like-minded women sounds appealing, listen up – the Women’s Empowerment Convention is headed to Dubai Opera. More than just a conference, it’s a celebration of female leadership, with role models from technology, start-ups, fashion, media, and more offering insights and sharing their success stories.

Learn more here.

March 12: Capture Nature

Start your day deep in the dunes with the Al Qudra Desert photo walk led by Gulf Photo Plus. With the assistance of a professional photographer, participants will be challenged to capture the essence of Al Qudra desert and Al Qudra lakes, gaining exposure to the colours, textures, flora, fauna, and atmosphere of the desert.

Learn more here.

March 19: Discover Uzbekistan

As a cultural landmark in a truly diverse city, Dubai Opera boasts an always-diverse programme, one that journeys audiences to exciting destinations. Now, you can journey to Central Asia from its rows of red seats as Bahor – the legendary State Dance Ensemble of Uzbekistan – performs hypnotic folk dances, complete with traditional instruments and colourful national costumes. 

Learn more here.

March 22: Begin Anew

Hosted by Miracles Wellness Center, the New Moon Sound Healing Meditation session is a wonderful opportunity to decide which direction you wish to pursue as the new moon is a time of new beginnings. Not only will you reflect on and manifest your dreams, but you’ll also be freed of energetic limitations with the help of sound healing, which will heighten your vibrational frequency.

Learn more here.

March 24: Explore Power

Culture junkies are in for a treat as the National Theatre screening of The Crucible arrives at Courtyard Playhouse for one night only. This unmissable production of Arthur Miller’s masterpiece stars Erin Doherty (The Crown) and Brendan Cowell (Yerma), and follows a group of young women who find that their words have a terrible power as a witch hunt begins in Salem.

Learn more here.

March 31: Embrace the Greats

Located at Souk Madinat Jumeirah, Theatre of Digital Art is an immersive art space that continues to diversify, hosting everything from VR experiences and jazz performances to breathwork meditation sessions. We’re marking our calendars for RUMInation, which will highlight the wisdom of poets Rumi, Hafiz, and Omar Khayyam through a 75-minute sound journey rooted in inner peace.

Learn more here.

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Around the World with Eid Al-Fitr

Celebrate the fast, differently

Eid al Fitr and Eid ul Fitr are different spellings of the same Arabic phrase which means “festival of breaking the fast”. “Eid” is the Arabic word for “festival” or “holiday”, and it is used to refer to both Eid ul Fitr and Eid al Adha, another important Islamic holiday that commemorates the willingness of Prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son, as an act of submission to (PBUH) Allah’s command.

This is a time when Muslims come together to offer prayers, exchange gifts, and share meals with their loved ones. It is also a time to reflect on the values of Islam, such as compassion, generosity, and forgiveness, and to strengthen ties with family, friends, and the community.

Eid’s Global Significance

Eid is one of the most significant and widely celebrated festivals in the world. It is an occasion that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting, and is a time of joy, celebration, and giving thanks. The significance of Eid is not just limited to Muslims; it is also recognised and celebrated by people from different cultures and religions around the world.

The significance of Eid varies across cultures and countries. In some countries, such as Egypt, Eid is celebrated for three days, while in others, such as Turkey, it is celebrated for four days. In some countries, such as Indonesia, Eid is known as “Lebaran” and is celebrated with traditional foods, such as Ketupat and Rendang. In other countries, such as Pakistan, Eid is a time for new clothes, henna designs, and special desserts, such as sheer khurma.

One of the most important aspects of Eid is the act of giving. Muslims are encouraged to donate to charity and to give gifts to friends and family members, especially to children. This act of giving is a way of expressing gratitude for the blessings that one has received throughout the year and is an opportunity to share those blessings with others.

Another important aspect of Eid is the gathering of family and friends. Muslims are encouraged to visit their relatives and loved ones during Eid and to strengthen ties with them. In some countries, such as Saudi Arabia, it is customary to visit the graves of loved ones during Eid and to pray for their souls.

Eid is also a time to forgive and seek forgiveness. Muslims are encouraged to forgive those who have wronged them and to seek forgiveness from those whom they have wronged. This act of forgiveness is a way of purifying one’s soul and starting anew.

UAE Eid Al-Fitr Celebrations

Eid al-Fitr is one of the most significant celebrations in the UAE, marking the end of Ramadan and a month-long fast from sunrise to sunset for Muslims. The festival is celebrated with much joy and enthusiasm, with families and friends coming together to share food, exchange gifts, and greetings, and participate in a range of traditions.

The day typically starts with a special Eid prayer, which is held at mosques and prayer grounds across the country. After the prayer, families often visit each other’s homes or gather in public spaces to enjoy traditional foods such as dates, sweets, and other delicacies. Children are often given money or gifts by their elders, and many families dress up in their finest clothes for the occasion.

In the UAE, there are also many events and activities that take place throughout the Eid al-Fitr period. These include traditional markets, food festivals, and cultural performances, as well as fireworks displays and other outdoor activities. Many shopping malls and other venues also hold special events and promotions during this time.

Overall, Eid al-Fitr is a time of joy and celebration in the UAE, with people of all ages and backgrounds coming together to share in the festivities and express their gratitude for the blessings of the past month.

Eid Celebrations Around the World

Eid al-Fitr is celebrated in various ways around the world, often reflecting the local cultural traditions and customs. Here are some examples:

Indonesia: In Indonesia, Eid al-Fitr is known as Lebaran. The celebrations typically last for one week, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and seek forgiveness from one another. Special food is prepared, including ketupat (a type of rice cake), rendang (spicy meat dish), and opor ayam (chicken in coconut milk).

Egypt: In Egypt, Eid al-Fitr is known as Eid el-Fitr. The celebrations last for three days, during which people wear new clothes and visit family and friends. Special dishes are prepared, including fata (a bread and rice dish), kahk (a type of biscuit), and maamoul (a sweet pastry).

Turkey: In Turkey, Eid al-Fitr is known as Şeker Bayramı (Sugar Festival). The celebrations last for three days, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and give candy or small gifts to children. Special dishes are prepared, including baklava (a sweet pastry) and güllaç (a dessert made from thin layers of pastry soaked in milk).

Malaysia: In Malaysia, Eid al-Fitr is known as Hari Raya Aidilfitri (Celebration Day). The celebrations last for one month, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and seek forgiveness from one another. Special dishes are prepared, including lemang (glutinous rice cooked in bamboo), rendang (spicy meat dish), and ketupat (a type of rice cake).

United States: In the United States, Eid al-Fitr is celebrated by Muslim communities across the country. Many communities hold special prayer services, followed by communal meals and other festivities. In some cities, there are even public celebrations, such as parades and street fairs.

Iceland: In Iceland, Eid al-Fitr celebrations are unique, in part, because the Ramadan fast is performed in a way that is not to be seen anywhere else in the world. Iceland’s midnight sun phenomenon means that during Ramadan many Muslims fast for up to 22 hours a day! Muslims in Iceland do have the choice to break their fast based on the timings of sunrise and sunset from the nearest country, or of Saudi Arabia, however many have iftar when the sun breaks above the Icelandic horizon. So when Eid al-Fitr comes around, the celebrations are magical. The capital city of Reykjavik has a few mosques where the joyous merrymaking takes place and guests come laden with food inspired by Indonesian, Egyptian, and Eritrean cuisines to celebrate this holy day.

Morocco: In Morocco, Eid al-Fitr festivities give center stage to the country’s colourful culinary dishes. Where other countries focus on gift-giving and more commercialised displays of celebrations, Moroccans, after their morning prayers, hold low-key foodie affairs with family and friends. Lamb, couscous, and prunes feature prominently in meals throughout the day, followed by traditional cookies and pastries.

These are just a few examples of how Eid al-Fitr is celebrated around the world. Regardless of the specific customs and traditions, the holiday is a time for joy, forgiveness, and a renewed commitment to one’s faith and community.

Eid is a significant festival that is celebrated around the world by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. It is a time of joy, celebration, and gratitude and is an opportunity to reflect on the values of Islam, such as compassion, generosity, and forgiveness. It is a time to strengthen ties with family, friends, and the community and to express thanks for the blessings that one has received throughout the year.

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