fbpx
Share:
diwali in abu dhabi

5 Places to Celebrate Diwali in Abu Dhabi

Go all out for the Festival Of Lights.

In Abu Dhabi and looking to celebrate Diwali in style this month? We’ve curated a list of experiences ranging from fine dining to family fun to help you ring in the Festival of Lights with lights, colour, and sparkle. Diwali will take place on Monday, October 24 this year and will be one of the most significant holidays for Hindus who reside in the UAE.

Apart from the religious festivities, celebrations include decorating homes with clay lamps, known as diyas, and creating decorative patterns called rangoli on the floor using coloured powders or sand. Most important, though, is the quality time spent with family and friends and indulging in delicious food and desserts. Read on to make your plans. And if you’re in Dubai, don’t worry – there’s plenty to do there too.

Diwali in UAE

Martabaan

Head down to Emirates Palace this weekend to take in the air and enjoy an all-day outdoor street food adventure with six stalls showcasing Indian street food and sweets at the Diwali Mela from October 22-24 between 11am and 7pm. There will be special Diwali gifts for every table, as well as Martabaan sweet boxes are also available to purchase.

Martabaan, Emirates Palace, Corniche Road, Abu Dhabi, 02 690 9000

Bollywood Parks

Bollywood Parks is at a prime location on the border between Abu Dhabi and Dubai, so it’s a great reason to stop by – whether you’re heading in or out of the capital. It really is a memorable destination on its own. It’s the first Bollywood-themed park in the world, and only 56 minutes from the heart of Abu Dhabi. The traditional Indian street dancers are the best part, along with the theatre performance that happens multiple times during the evening.

There is a lot to do apart from the customary performances. There’s the rocket-shaped gravity ride, carousels, vibrant hang gliders, and the Bollywood Sky Flyer, which holds the record for the largest swing ride in the world. From food and rides to just soaking in the vibes inspired by your favourite blockbusters, there is something for everyone at this theme park.

Bollywood Parks, Sheikh Zayed Road, Dubai, 800 262 9464, www.bollywoodparksdubai.com

diwali celebration in abu dhabi

Osmo Lounge

There is no better location than Osmo to celebrate Diwali in Abu Dhabi. Visit the terrace to enjoy a variety of healthy street snacks, nibbles, and treats while admiring the magnificent Yas Bay fireworks. Live stations will provide typical fare like chaat, pani puri, freshly grilled tandoori skewers, a variety of samosas, and tea. You can order off the à la carte menu or enjoy the benefits of the limitless meal and soft drink offer for just AED 200.

Osmo Lounge, Yas Bay, Yas Island, Abu Dhabi, 02 208 6900, www.hilton.com

Yas Bay Waterfront Fireworks

Yas Bay Waterfront Fireworks

What better way to celebrate the Festival of Lights than to visit Yas Bay and take in the breathtaking fireworks display? You can enjoy this spectacle that will light up the sky on Monday, October 24. To experience a wonderful light show for the Festival of Lights, be there by 9pm.

Yas Bay Waterfront fireworks, Yas Island Yas West, Abu Dhabi, www.yasbay.ae

Capila Pool Bar & Grill

Capila Pool Bar & Grill

If you’re in Abu Dhabi for the weekend after Diwali, the Hilton Abu Dhabi Yas Island will continue to celebrate the Festival of Lights on October 29, and invites guests to enjoy a memorable Diwali. You can visit the spice market at Capila Pool Bar & Grill and DIY your own delicious chaat. The exquisite masala bike will serve tantalising Indian dishes while the tandoori BBQ will dish out succulent tikka. As no celebration is complete without dessert, guests can end their meal with indulgent Indian sweets. The Hilton Abu Dhabi Yas Island’s façade will come to life with a special 3D animated light show, and you’ll have a view of the fireworks at Yas Bay.

Capila Pool Bar & Grill, Hilton Abu Dhabi Yas Island, 02 208 6900, [email protected]

Share:

Our Newsletter

Our Newsletter

Your Female Email

Gaggler your inbox for a 10% discount on your first order!
By clicking ‘Subscribe’ you agree to receive emails from The Gaggler and accept our privacy policy and terms of use.
Share:

Around the World with Eid Al-Fitr

Celebrate the fast, differently

Eid al Fitr and Eid ul Fitr are different spellings of the same Arabic phrase which means “festival of breaking the fast”. “Eid” is the Arabic word for “festival” or “holiday”, and it is used to refer to both Eid ul Fitr and Eid al Adha, another important Islamic holiday that commemorates the willingness of Prophet Ibrahim to sacrifice his son, as an act of submission to (PBUH) Allah’s command.

This is a time when Muslims come together to offer prayers, exchange gifts, and share meals with their loved ones. It is also a time to reflect on the values of Islam, such as compassion, generosity, and forgiveness, and to strengthen ties with family, friends, and the community.

Eid’s Global Significance

Eid is one of the most significant and widely celebrated festivals in the world. It is an occasion that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting, and is a time of joy, celebration, and giving thanks. The significance of Eid is not just limited to Muslims; it is also recognised and celebrated by people from different cultures and religions around the world.

The significance of Eid varies across cultures and countries. In some countries, such as Egypt, Eid is celebrated for three days, while in others, such as Turkey, it is celebrated for four days. In some countries, such as Indonesia, Eid is known as “Lebaran” and is celebrated with traditional foods, such as Ketupat and Rendang. In other countries, such as Pakistan, Eid is a time for new clothes, henna designs, and special desserts, such as sheer khurma.

One of the most important aspects of Eid is the act of giving. Muslims are encouraged to donate to charity and to give gifts to friends and family members, especially to children. This act of giving is a way of expressing gratitude for the blessings that one has received throughout the year and is an opportunity to share those blessings with others.

Another important aspect of Eid is the gathering of family and friends. Muslims are encouraged to visit their relatives and loved ones during Eid and to strengthen ties with them. In some countries, such as Saudi Arabia, it is customary to visit the graves of loved ones during Eid and to pray for their souls.

Eid is also a time to forgive and seek forgiveness. Muslims are encouraged to forgive those who have wronged them and to seek forgiveness from those whom they have wronged. This act of forgiveness is a way of purifying one’s soul and starting anew.

UAE Eid Al-Fitr Celebrations

Eid al-Fitr is one of the most significant celebrations in the UAE, marking the end of Ramadan and a month-long fast from sunrise to sunset for Muslims. The festival is celebrated with much joy and enthusiasm, with families and friends coming together to share food, exchange gifts, and greetings, and participate in a range of traditions.

The day typically starts with a special Eid prayer, which is held at mosques and prayer grounds across the country. After the prayer, families often visit each other’s homes or gather in public spaces to enjoy traditional foods such as dates, sweets, and other delicacies. Children are often given money or gifts by their elders, and many families dress up in their finest clothes for the occasion.

In the UAE, there are also many events and activities that take place throughout the Eid al-Fitr period. These include traditional markets, food festivals, and cultural performances, as well as fireworks displays and other outdoor activities. Many shopping malls and other venues also hold special events and promotions during this time.

Overall, Eid al-Fitr is a time of joy and celebration in the UAE, with people of all ages and backgrounds coming together to share in the festivities and express their gratitude for the blessings of the past month.

Eid Celebrations Around the World

Eid al-Fitr is celebrated in various ways around the world, often reflecting the local cultural traditions and customs. Here are some examples:

Indonesia: In Indonesia, Eid al-Fitr is known as Lebaran. The celebrations typically last for one week, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and seek forgiveness from one another. Special food is prepared, including ketupat (a type of rice cake), rendang (spicy meat dish), and opor ayam (chicken in coconut milk).

Egypt: In Egypt, Eid al-Fitr is known as Eid el-Fitr. The celebrations last for three days, during which people wear new clothes and visit family and friends. Special dishes are prepared, including fata (a bread and rice dish), kahk (a type of biscuit), and maamoul (a sweet pastry).

Turkey: In Turkey, Eid al-Fitr is known as Şeker Bayramı (Sugar Festival). The celebrations last for three days, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and give candy or small gifts to children. Special dishes are prepared, including baklava (a sweet pastry) and güllaç (a dessert made from thin layers of pastry soaked in milk).

Malaysia: In Malaysia, Eid al-Fitr is known as Hari Raya Aidilfitri (Celebration Day). The celebrations last for one month, during which people visit their relatives and friends, and seek forgiveness from one another. Special dishes are prepared, including lemang (glutinous rice cooked in bamboo), rendang (spicy meat dish), and ketupat (a type of rice cake).

United States: In the United States, Eid al-Fitr is celebrated by Muslim communities across the country. Many communities hold special prayer services, followed by communal meals and other festivities. In some cities, there are even public celebrations, such as parades and street fairs.

Iceland: In Iceland, Eid al-Fitr celebrations are unique, in part, because the Ramadan fast is performed in a way that is not to be seen anywhere else in the world. Iceland’s midnight sun phenomenon means that during Ramadan many Muslims fast for up to 22 hours a day! Muslims in Iceland do have the choice to break their fast based on the timings of sunrise and sunset from the nearest country, or of Saudi Arabia, however many have iftar when the sun breaks above the Icelandic horizon. So when Eid al-Fitr comes around, the celebrations are magical. The capital city of Reykjavik has a few mosques where the joyous merrymaking takes place and guests come laden with food inspired by Indonesian, Egyptian, and Eritrean cuisines to celebrate this holy day.

Morocco: In Morocco, Eid al-Fitr festivities give center stage to the country’s colourful culinary dishes. Where other countries focus on gift-giving and more commercialised displays of celebrations, Moroccans, after their morning prayers, hold low-key foodie affairs with family and friends. Lamb, couscous, and prunes feature prominently in meals throughout the day, followed by traditional cookies and pastries.

These are just a few examples of how Eid al-Fitr is celebrated around the world. Regardless of the specific customs and traditions, the holiday is a time for joy, forgiveness, and a renewed commitment to one’s faith and community.

Eid is a significant festival that is celebrated around the world by Muslims and non-Muslims alike. It is a time of joy, celebration, and gratitude and is an opportunity to reflect on the values of Islam, such as compassion, generosity, and forgiveness. It is a time to strengthen ties with family, friends, and the community and to express thanks for the blessings that one has received throughout the year.

Share:

Our Newsletter

Our Newsletter

Your Female Email

Gaggler your inbox for a 10% discount on your first order!
By clicking ‘Subscribe’ you agree to receive emails from The Gaggler and accept our privacy policy and terms of use.
Load More